Food. Waste not, want not

17th October 2018

Did you know almost 900,000 tonnes of bread is wasted every year in the UK? That’s around 24 million slices every day – enough for everyone in Australia to have a slice!

Food waste is a hot topic, with the Government recently announcing that it will subsidise food waste distribution to the tune of £15m. Jamie Oliver has been getting in on the act too.

Our senior account manager Charlotte headed to the Hotpoint Fresh Thinking Café in East London to see Oliver host a workshop about food waste and what we can do to reduce it – on a personal level, it really is easy!

Alongside bread, the most wasted food in the UK includes; bagged salad, vegetables, fruit, milk, eggs, cheese, meat and fish. As well as wasting good food, we’re also wasting money, with the average UK family losing nearly £60 every month by throwing away nearly an entire meal each day.

Big corporations are starting to act to reduce food waste, with Tesco, for example, recently removing best before labels from around 70 pre-packed produce lines, including apples, potatoes, tomatoes and onions. But what can we do to make everyday changes for the better?

  1. Know the difference between a “use by” and “best before” date
    a) A “use by” date is about safety and will be seen on perishable foods such as meat. Do not eat, cook or freeze food after this date and make sure you follow storage instructions carefully
    b) “Best before” dates indicate quality rather than safety. The food can still be consumed but may not be at its best
  2. Learn simple hacks to see if the food is ok. To test the freshness of an egg for example, pop it in cold water. If it sinks, it’s generally fresh but if it floats it’s best to bin it. All Lion Quality eggs have a best-before date printed on the shell as well as on the egg box to ensure freshness
  3. Whiz stale bread into breadcrumbs to sprinkle over pasta and put older vegetables in the slow cooker
  4. Batch cook meals in advance and keep them frozen in portions
  5. Create weekly meal plans which use the same ingredients in different ways

So, next time you’re about to throw something away, take a moment to think how it can be used again.

Food. Waste not, want not

17th October 2018

Did you know almost 900,000 tonnes of bread is wasted every year in the UK? That’s around 24 million slices every day – enough for everyone in Australia to have a slice!

Food waste is a hot topic, with the Government recently announcing that it will subsidise food waste distribution to the tune of £15m. Jamie Oliver has been getting in on the act too.

Our senior account manager Charlotte headed to the Hotpoint Fresh Thinking Café in East London to see Oliver host a workshop about food waste and what we can do to reduce it – on a personal level, it really is easy!

Alongside bread, the most wasted food in the UK includes; bagged salad, vegetables, fruit, milk, eggs, cheese, meat and fish. As well as wasting good food, we’re also wasting money, with the average UK family losing nearly £60 every month by throwing away nearly an entire meal each day.

Big corporations are starting to act to reduce food waste, with Tesco, for example, recently removing best before labels from around 70 pre-packed produce lines, including apples, potatoes, tomatoes and onions. But what can we do to make everyday changes for the better?

  1. Know the difference between a “use by” and “best before” date
    a) A “use by” date is about safety and will be seen on perishable foods such as meat. Do not eat, cook or freeze food after this date and make sure you follow storage instructions carefully
    b) “Best before” dates indicate quality rather than safety. The food can still be consumed but may not be at its best
  2. Learn simple hacks to see if the food is ok. To test the freshness of an egg for example, pop it in cold water. If it sinks, it’s generally fresh but if it floats it’s best to bin it. All Lion Quality eggs have a best-before date printed on the shell as well as on the egg box to ensure freshness
  3. Whiz stale bread into breadcrumbs to sprinkle over pasta and put older vegetables in the slow cooker
  4. Batch cook meals in advance and keep them frozen in portions
  5. Create weekly meal plans which use the same ingredients in different ways

So, next time you’re about to throw something away, take a moment to think how it can be used again.